I’ve had a lot of conversations recently about knowledge (and more specifically, remembering knowledge). I’m sure most people would agree that whilst Google and Sat Navs, for example, have often saved the day, it’s been at a price. There’s no need to pay attention to sign-posts or remember landmarks anymore – no need to learn that fact or that capital city – we can just look it up. Sadly, though, through this process, I believe we’ve also lost a respect for memory – something which we should be actively developing and challenging, rather than passively, perhaps, buying into strategies which may actually be compromising it.

Research shows that memories and learning, are laid down through repetition – practice – habits. I was taught a song when I was about seven – The Books of the Bible – 66 titles, tricky in parts – Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, Deuteronomy…’ I still remember that song thirty-odd years later. Sure, occasionally, I’ve had to think hard in order to recall it but I can. It wasn’t learned under duress, nobody forced me – it was modelled and we just sang it – repeatedly.

Some would argue, ‘Well, what’s the use of knowing that?’ – I’ve sometimes asked myself the same thing – but I’m not sure that’s the point – or maybe that’s exactly the point. At the time, there wasn’t a reason given – nobody said ‘learn this and you’ll impress your RE teacher…’ (it did), or ‘it’s a super party trick – a real ice-breaker…’ (wouldn’t know, never tried it) – we just learned it. We don’t always need to have a reason to remember something. We just need the opportunity and perhaps more importantly, the expectation.

I have often, with somewhat of a guilty conscience, explained a lack of pupil memory with self-talk like, ‘maybe I’m not making this engaging enough…maybe this isn’t what they’re interested in, maybe I’m not doing something quite right.’ So, instead of demanding my children develop memory and recall (and giving them the opportunities and expectation to do so), I perhaps, compromise it further; over time, I have stuck up hundreds of words on my walls, coloured card, laminated, pretty. I’ve hung things from the ceiling (which often just got in the way) and I’ve spent ages creating word-mats and other resources which I then have to remind them to go and look at when they get stuck.

Is this helping them or holding them back? Is there just so much ‘stuff’ everywhere, that they don’t actually see any of it? Is it efficient or is it simply a crutch? I can’t be the only one to have created these kinds of resources only to observe pupils paying very little or no attention to them whatsoever.

I’m not questioning the good intentions of such resources or that in some cases, they are helpful – what I am questioning is whether there is a better way – a more efficient way. If the words are on the wall, they won’t need to memorise them – they’re on the wall – and even then, there’s no guarantee that they’ll make the effort to stop what they’re doing and go and look…why would they? That requires an interruption to their current thinking – their train of thought. It’s frustrating. They have to stop, get up off their chair, walk over to the wall, find the right word, go back and sit down and pick up where they left off…possibly having disturbed others around them on the way – are we advocating this process over simply teaching them to remember the words that they’ll need and providing them with the opportunities to recall them?

I get that over time, there’s a hope that they’ll remember stuff because it’s on the wall – that it’ll somehow be absorbed – but I’m not sure ‘hope’ is an adequate strategy. Is it really too much for us to expect our children to remember and verbally recall, by heart, a bank of adverbs, a bank of synonyms for ‘said’ or whatever…? I don’t think so. And yet…

Consider the lengths that we go to, to ensure that memory is not optimised – not challenged. We print, photocopy, laminate, display – we cover walls, literally, with bits of printed paper, which often can’t be seen from where pupils sit anyway. We cover walls with words that could quite possibly, be memorised through repetitive, rhythmic chanting, through singing, through saying them, spelling them, over and over. This doesn’t have to be dull – it can be a positive experience, it can build confidence through a collaborative, happy ‘noise’. Yet, we continue to resort to printing and laminating hundreds of words for display – year after year, in thousands of classrooms, in hundreds of thousands of schools, all over the world. Think about that for a second. From an environmental perspective alone, this should be considered outrageous, regardless of whether or not it actually made any difference to children’s learning.

Our memories are absolutely incredible and whilst I don’t, and probably never will, understand how it all works, I do know that if I don’t use it, I’ll probably lose it. I really can’t see any harm in expecting a child to learn, rhythmically and off by heart, ‘quickly, quietly, carefully, cautiously’ or ‘grumbled, mumbled, stuttered and yelled’ – or whatever. Why does it have to go on the wall?

Reading this back, it does sound like a bit of a rant – it’s not meant to. I just think that sometimes, the very things we do, because we’ve always considered them ‘good practice’, and because we’ve always done them that way, are the very things we should be questioning. I guess we owe it to our children, and to ourselves, to remember to do that occasionally.

 

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One thought on “Remember, remember..?

  1. Made me think Caroline. I remember some things but not others. I remember that I read somewhere a long time ago that in one copy of the New York Times there is as much information published as the average person was exposed to in an entire lifetime in the 17th Century. The demand on our memories increases exponentially daily. In the context of evolution 4 centuries is a miniscule moment in time and our memories have had no time to adjust – which is probably why we invented writing things down. I also remember that I read somewhere that if you want to move a memory from your short-term memory to your long-term memory you need to repeat it within 24 hours or it will be lost. One other fact about memory is that if you engage the emotions you engage the amygdala and these memories can last for ever. I will, for example, never forget climbing Mt Kinabalu with Graham!

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